Thursday, May 12, 2016

More About The Music

The music I play is a Baroque-Celtic hybrid. It’s a style played in Scotland in the mid-1700s called Scottish Drawing Room Music, a mix of traditional Celtic dance music and Baroque arrangements.
It helps to know that in the 18th century traditional and classical music were close cousins. Many musicians played both styles, and Baroque music was not far removed from its dance roots, evidenced by the wealth of suites that were collections of movements in varying dance forms. Drawing Room Music often took a Scottish dance melody and arranged it in sets of variations patterned after those Baroque suites. Variations were written as melodic and rhythmic variants of the original tune, the former introducing more complicated musical phrases, the latter similar phrases in different dance forms.
I also play fife and bagpipe marches on string instruments, and I play Scottish and Irish jigs, reels, and hornpipes. I especially love the slow, hauntingly beautiful airs that constitute a large part of the Celtic repertoire and the tunes of Turlough O’Carolan, an 18th-century Irish harper whose tunes, like Scottish Drawing Room Music, blended Baroque and traditional elements. Finally, I have written tunes in the style of 18th-century Scottish music.
This was the music popular in the British Isles and colonial America in the 1700s, and through my music I recreate a bit of the feel of an evening of music in colonial times.